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WALLACE W. GEORGE (1916-1920)

ROBERT L. SCHOFIELD (1920-1924)

ALEXANDER LIPPAY (1925)

FRANCISCO SANTIAGO (1931) First Filipino Director of UP Conservatory

RAMON TAPALES (1946-1969)

ELISEO M. PAJARO (1967-1968)

RUBY K. MANGAHAS (1969-1977)

RAMON P. SANTOS (1978-1988)

JUAN P. RAMOS (1988-1997)

REYNALDO T. PAGUIO (1997-1999)

MAURICIA D. BORROMEO (2000-2004)

RAMON ACOYMO (2004-2010)

 


WALLACE W. GEORGE (1916-1920)

The formal opening of the Conservatory, in a large building at 963 R. Hidalgo Street, Quiapo, Manila took place on 4 September 1916. This was during the term of Ignacio Villamor (1915-1920), the second president of U.P. and the first Filipino to assume such position. The first director of the Conservatory of Music was Mr. Wallace W. George, a voice professor from the New England Conservatory of Music of Boston, Massachusetts, with Mr. Fernando Canon as secretary.
Director George selected his faculty members by having them undergo individual tests.

 

The first faculty of the Conservatory were:
Pedro Dizon, piano
Emilia Servoza de Guzman, piano
Guy F. Harrison, harmony
Cayetano Jacobe, violin
Harriet Ladd Marble, voice
Francisco Santiago, piano


The enrollment increased the following years, hence more members of the faculty were appointed. Two students who showed good scholarship standing were also admitted to the teaching staff. They were:
Lucia Francisco, piano
Elisa Maffei de Luna, piano and voice
Other faculty members appointed included:
Nicanor Abelardo, composition and harmony
Fernando Canon, Jr., guitar
Minnie Hershler, modern languages
Conchita Cruz Herrera, piano


Director George resigned in 1919. Mr. Guy F. Harrison was made acting director, with Mr. Apolinario Batoon as the temporary secretary and vice-secretary Mr. Carreon. Pianist Serafin Magracia was added to the faculty.


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ROBERT L. SCHOFIELD (1920-1924)

Robert L. Schofield was appointed Director of the Conservatory of Music in 1920 during President Guy Potter Benton's (1921-1923) incumbency. During Mr. Schofield's term, new subjects were added to the curriculum such as musical form and elementary orchestration and instrumentation for those majoring in composition. In school year 1923-1924, the Soloist Diploma in Piano was granted for the first time to Rosario Lopez-Quintos.


In October 1921, the first University Song Collection, edited by Director Schofield, was published. The songs were composed by Schofield, Nicanor Abelardo, Thomas Hastings, Petrona Ramos, Francisco Santiago, Gregoria Rodil, Rosa Jimenez, Lucia Francisco, and Pascuala Alson.


Director Schofield encouraged the faculty members and students to compose works based on Filipino folk songs. Francisco Santiago and Bonifacio Abdon composed the infamous Kundimans. Nicanor Abelardo wrote the first Concerto for Piano and Orchestra based on native themes. Antonio Molina did Filipino pieces for chamber groups and Serafin Magracia wrote a few piano pieces.


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ALEXANDER LIPPAY (1924-1930)

During Director's Lippay term, the Conservatory moved to a building at the corner of Nebraska and Isaac Peral. In the first year of his term, departments of the Conservatory were reorganized. A position of Dean of Women was created to look after the interest and welfare of the female students of the Conservatory. The Music Library was organized and the formation of the Conservatory Symphony Orchestra took place at about 1925.


The additional members of the faculty appointed during Director Lippay's term were the following:
Julio Esteban Anguita, piano
Galia Arellano, voice
Emilia Cobarrubias, voice
Manuel Arellano, asst. to the Director
Rafael Hermann, violin
Victorina Lobregat, piano
Manual Martinez de Monseratt, piano
Rosa PiƱon, voice


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FRANCISCO SANTIAGO (1930-1946)

In 1930, Dr. Francisco Santiago was appointed Director fo the Conservatory, making him the first Filipino to assume the position. In 1933, the Conservatory was moved to the Villamor Hall on Taft Avenue and Padre Faura. This was during the term of President Jorge C. Bocobo (1934-1939).


The Bachelor of Music degree was offered for the first time in the school year 1930-31. Entrance requirement for this two-year course was a high school diploma and a Teacher's Certificate in Music.

 

The first four students who where granted the Bachelor of Music degree from the Conservatory in 1933 were:
Veneranda Acayan, violin
Julio Esteban Anguita, piano
Juan S. Hernandez, composition
Isabel de Padua, voice


In 1931, the Philharmonic Orchestra of the Conservatory under the baton of Director Santiago made its debut in a Folk Song Recital with some visiting English singers. In school year 1934-35, plans were formulated for the organization of a Symphony Concert Society in order to offer the quality music within the reach of students who cannot afford to pay high prices of admission that was demanded of other symphonic concerts. Ramon Tapales was tasked to direct this symphony orchestra.


In the same year, President Bocobo recommended that a permanent "Filipino Art Fund" be created at the University for the preservation and cultivation of Filipino art, such as music, folk dance, drama, literature, painting, decoration, and sculpture. With Director Santiago as chairman, a committee was formed to take care of the study, preservation, and dissemination of Philippine folksongs. Trips were made to the provinces from 1935-1938 for the compilation of native songs and dances totalling 238 Filipino folk dance and 189 Filipino folk songs.


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RAMON TAPALES (1946-1969)

The Conservatory was closed at the outbreak of the war in 1941. It opened again in January 1946 with Ramon Tapales as Director. Dr. Bienvenido M. Gonzales was the President of the University (1935-1943, 1945-1951).


In 1947, Director Tapales announced the introduction of new courses of study which covered from seven to ten years: a preparatory course for non-high school graduates which could lead to any of the following.
a. Soloist course, leading to an artist disploma majoring in instrument or voice.
b. Normal course, leading to a teacher's diploma, majoring in instrument, voice, music science and composition, and conducting.


In school year 1959-60, the curriculum was revised to include the general education courses instituted by the University in the Bachelor of Music course. The musicianship course, which also took the place of the normal course for wind instruments, was introduced. Furthermore, updating of the various curricula took place resulting in the abolition, integration or introduction of new subjects.


The UP Concert Chorus, with Director Tapales as conductor and Juan Pedraza Ramos as assistant-conductor was founded in 1962. The UP Madrigal Singers was founded in 1963, with Andrea Veneracion as conductor.


In 1963-1964, the Master of Music (MM) Program with majors in piano, voice, violin, musicology, theory and composition was offered. The first graduate of the MM Program (piano) was Luzviminda Dominguez. Music Education as a major in Bachelor in Music course was instituted during the second semester of 1965, and the Master of Music in Music Education in the second semester of 1966.


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ELISEO M. PAJARO (1967-1968)

In 1967-68, the one-semester special training program in music education for public school music teachers was offered to improve basic skills in music teaching. With classes held every Saturday, the program benefited 33 divisions of the Department of Education.


In 1968-69, a memorandum of agreement was signed by the University and the Bureau of Public School designating the Conservatory as the official training center in music for public elementary school teachers from all over the Philippines. An Initial number of 40 teachers, representing 40 divisions enrolled. They came to be known as the UP-BPS music scholars.


The preparatory department for children was also launched in 1968 and was received enthusiastically by the community. Only 104 children were admitted to the program because of limited facilities. These children were given training in their respective instruments, in elementary music theory, Asian instruments, ballet, and operatta.


The Conservatory of Music changed into the College of Music during the term of Dr. Pajaro. Dr. Carlos P. Romulo was the President of the University (1962-1968).


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RUBY K. MANGAHAS (1969-1977)

Dr. Ruby K. Mangahas was appointed acting dean in March 1969 and then dean in February 1970. From 1969-1971, a general review of the school's undergraduate and non-degree curricula took place. In the school-year 1971-72, two new degree programs were introduced: Bachelor of Music in Music Literature and Bachelor of Music in Theory, both with the aim of encouraging musicological research in Philippine music. In her term, the College of Music had six types of curricular program namely:
1. Graduate Degree Course (Master of Music) in instruments, voice, music theory, musicology, composition, and music education;
2. Undergraduate Degree Course (Bachelor of Music) in instruments, voice, composition, music literature, music theory, choral conducting, band conducting, and music education;
3. Diploma Course: a) Artist Diploma in instruments and voice, b) Teacher's Diploma in instruments, voice and composition;
4. Certificate Course for children;
5. Special Training Course for members of the Philippine Army Band;
6. Preparatory Course for Children.


The Philippine Youth Orchestra (PYO) was established in 1975. The Musical Arts and Research Foundation (MUSAR) was created. The UP Madrigal Singers, the UP Concert Chorus and the UP Cherubim/Seraphim attained international prominence. Dr. Salvador P. Lopez was the President (1969-1975).


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RAMON P. SANTOS (1978-1988)

Ten years of the administration of Dean Ramon P. Santos, starting in 1978, brought some changes and growth in the life of the College. A highly selective and strict admission policy was adopted. The entire academic program was reviewed, resulting in the revision of the Teacher's Diploma, the Certificate of Proficiency and the Artist Diploma. These were replaced with the Diploma in Creative Performing and Musical Arts (DCPMA).


The Bachelor of Music was strengthened and re-structured into a five-year program. New major areas were instituted -- Dance, Asian Music, and a post-baccalaureate program in Ethnomusicology. Performances and other community and extension services of its faculty and students averaged more than 100 events annually. In-service training program for local as well as foreign groups were conducted by the faculty. For the first time, a professional dance company was attached to the College. New linkages were forged, while existing ones were strengthened in major collaborative projects, including international conferences, festivals, and research activities.


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JUAN P. RAMOS (1988-1997)

Juan "Johnny" Pedraza Ramos is largely credited with improving the facilities and infrastructure of the College -- such as the expansion of the Music Library, the creation of a Specialty Books section, and the construction of the Camerata courtyard -- and with acquiring additional equipment and musical instruments. It was also through his efforts that the College opened a new wing which made it possible for the College to provide a room-studio for the percussion majors, permanent room for the gamelan, and a fully furnished mini-concert hall for 100 persons. Included in the new wing is the museum housing of some collection of Philippine and Asian instruments.

 

Two new College-based performing groups --- The UP Musika Asya (Philippine Gong Orchestra) and the Koto Ensemble -- were established to train young talents in Philippine and Asian musics. These are vital for the improvement of playing techniques and performance skills, particularly for students in the College's Asian Music program. A female chamber vocal ensemble, the Awitaan (composed of members, who individually, are performing artists in their own right) was also organized. The year-long Thursday Evening Concerts which featured faculty, students and alumni of the College, as well as visiting and Filipino artists-performers was well organized.

 

As part of the re-evaluation and re-development of the College to meet the needs of the 21st century, the following new curriculum offerings were initiated: the institution of a three-year Certificate of Music (CM) with concentration on performing areas of piano, voice, strings, and winds and percussion. The Certificate allows a medium-term course that has sufficient emphasis on musicianship and performance and its required discipline in a formal institution such as the College. The focus is on the strengthening of performance skills and musicianship and the acquisition of an adequate musical background which also enables the student in the future to pursue further musical and academic education. The revised Master of Musical Curricular Programs included the institution of Choral/Instrumental Conducting as an area of specialization. Dean Ramos was reappointed Dean of the College in 1992.


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REYNALDO T. PAGUIO (1997-1999)

Robert L. Schofield was


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MAURICIA D. BORROMEO (2000-2004)

Prof. Mauricia D. Borromeo holds graduate music degrees (Master of Music and Master of Music Education) from the University of the Philippines and the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. At the latter, she was twice-awarded the prestigious Levi Barbour Scholarship for Oriental Women and elected to the Pi Kappa Lambda, Chi Chapter, National Music Honor Society of the United States. Prior to her return to the Philippines, she was an active member of the Ann Arbor Piano Teachers' Guild, having earned a Michigan and National Certification in Piano Teaching. A co-founder of the PUNLA, a musico-cultural school for American-born Filipino children, she has performed and directed several cultural presentations in the Ann Arbor area, Michigan.

In l986, Ms. Borromeo was re-appointed to the music faculty of the University of the Philippines where she teaches piano performance, music theory, and music education. She has also served as president of the Piano Teachers' Guild of the Philippines for two terms, and resource speaker at regional and national music education and piano pedagogy
seminar-workshops. She has authored articles on Philippine Music in the Encyclopedia of Philippine Art (l994) and was tutor to several piano winners of the National Music Competitions for Young Artists (NAMCYA) for which she serves as regional judge in the choral and instrumental categories.

Ms. Borromeo is Dean of the U. P. College of Music (2000-2004). She is also chair for Music of the Technical Panel for the Humanities and Social Sciences, Commission of Higher Education, and vice-president of the Philippine Society for Music Education and member of the U.P. Taskforce on Basic Education and Makabayan. She has served as chair of the Music Education Department of the UP College of Music, vice-chair of the Humanities Division of the National Research Council of the Philippines, and member of the Executive Committee on Music, National Commission on Culture and Arts. Whenever time permits, she continues to perform as collaborating artists at recitals of colleagues and promising young artists.


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RAMON ACOYMO, PhD (2004-2010)

Ramon Acoymo has been described by the press on three continents as "mesmerizing" in New York, "successful" in Rottenburg and "remarkable" in Manila. A first-prize winner of the US National Association of Teachers of Singing Competition, he has released three compact discs in America. His Lincoln Center recital debut was hailed a "triumph" by Headline Philippines, New York; and no less than the New York Times accorded him good notices for his theater debut as the lead in Flower Drum Song. Among his opera portrayals have been "Canio" in Leoncavallo's Pagliacci, "Tamino" and "Monostatos" in Mozart's Die Zauberflote and the title roles in Blake's The Bear with the Hongkong Chamber Orchestra Society, "Oedipus" in Stravinsky's Oedipus Rex and "Pagong" in Philippine National Artist Lucrecia Kasilag's Ang Pagong at ang Matsing, a role which he created.


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